A Devotion May Be Someone's Only Bible

Spirit & Trust

Trust is hard. It’s easy to say there is trust but actually taking the step – making the leap into mid-air without a visible net is the most difficult thing man can do. But with the Spirit of God our leap lands us safe in His palm.

Waiting Isn't Easy

The day at school was busy.

I was knee deep in state testing materials and schedules, trying to make sure every student in our building finished testing before the end of April.

As I walked down the hall toward the teacher’s lounge, I saw one of my students coming down the opposite side. He smiled big and said, “Mrs. Frazier, when are you going to get us?” (This is code word for when is guidance class?)  I told him I wouldn’t see him for another two months—thinking he would never understand how long that was.

He looked up to the sky, used both hands—as if to count the number of days within two months—stopped counting after five, and said, “Sounds good.” Then he skipped all the way down the hall. He didn’t mind waiting because he knew I would eventually spend time with him.

When we have to wait, it’s not as easy, but the psalmist encourages us to. Many of us picture waiting as if we’re sitting in a doctor’s office with a couple of magazines in front of us, watching the minute hand on the wall clock, and listening carefully for our name to be called. But waiting is getting ready with expectation and excitement that God is going to complete His promises in and through us.

Remembering two things will help us with our waiting. One, we will see an answer, because God always answers our prayers. It may not be exactly what we are looking for or want at the time, but if we are seeking God, He changes our wants and desires to reflect exactly what He wants and desires for us.

Second, don’t take for granted what we are doing while we wait. God is preparing us in our current situation, even if it doesn’t look like it. By discrediting our training, we might miss out on a blessing that will later bless others.

When God asks you to wait, do so with expectation.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



Taking a Walk

I was twelve, and Dad kept his promise. 

Dad loved to hunt and eat squirrel, and wanted me to also. I heard the hinges squeak on my bedroom door as Dad peeked his head in to wake me. He didn’t have to call my name. I had been awake for hours.

The air hung heavy with humidity yet still emitted a fall crispness. Stately oaks greeted us, and moss covered their branches like a quilt on a cold winter night. But I couldn’t see any of this when we arrived. Daylight was at least an hour away.

We walked slowly through the woods. Dew decorated the limbs of the small scrub bushes, giving me a brief shower every time Dad let one flap my way. I followed Dad’s flashlight beam as it scattered across the forest floor and pranced through the treetops.

Finally, Dad found the right place for me. “Sit here and wait,” he said, and he walked off to find his tree.

God had a habit of walking with Adam and Eve, perhaps daily. He created humanity for fellowship, so this would only be natural. Then sin entered. Satan tempted the couple, and they gave in to the one thing God asked them not to do. Sin broke their intimate fellowship. God removed the couple from the garden, placed angels at its entrance, and provided skins for their newly-discovered nakedness.

God wants the same type of relationship with everyone, just as He had with Adam and Eve. I, like Adam and Eve, have often messed up God's walk with me. I’ve sinned and not confessed. I’ve gotten too busy in other things—even good things. I’ve focused too much on relationships with others. I could go on. You probably could too.

The good news is—just like walking with my dad until he found the right place for me—none of the past or present can hinder my walk with God unless I choose to let it. God is in the restoration business, as He proved with the first couple. No matter what we’ve done, past or present, He can cover it so the walks can continue. All we have to do is give it to Him.

If something is messing up your walk with God, ask Him to remove it.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



Good Things

All day long I toiled, thinking God was angry with me. I repeated everything I did in my mind. It was overwhelming.

At the store, I played the claw game. I was shocked when the claw picked up a small prize. It was a happy bear with his arms spread open wide. If you squeezed its belly, it said, “I love you.”

Suddenly, the biblical truth “all good things come from God” came to mind. Because all good things come from God, I realized He willed me to win this bear.  It was His way of telling me, “Hey, I still love you.” God was giving me a hug.

When we remember all good things come from God, we are reminded of His love through the little things He gives us each day.

Think about the good things that have happened to you today, and remember God is sending His love to you.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



God's Light

On the urging of the neurologist, I took my son to the ER. We needed answers.

Increased headaches three months after my son’s brain surgery prompted another visit to the emergency room. His neurologist feared the symptoms signaled a new problem. She expressed her concerns to the surgeon. After he viewed the latest MRI, the surgeon believed there wasn’t anything to worry about.

Our hopes were met with disappointment and frustration. The surgeon’s partner was the on-call doctor at the emergency room. After a brief look at my son’s incision, he replied, “I’ve seen worse.” He told us neurologists and neurosurgeons don’t always agree and sent my son home.

We received a second opinion for my son’s ongoing pain, and the MRI showed damage to the brain from the surgery. This truth didn’t take away my son’s pain, but did justify it.

Upon self-examination, I realized I’ve been guilty of excusing my behavior by saying, “I’ve seen worse.” But God’s words will light our path. He always sees the truth and says no sin is greater than another. Nor does God compare or judge us.

The words of the world can either hurt or heal, guide or misguide. Without an anchor, hurtful words can pull us into the darkness, with the goal of transforming us to their standards.

Maybe you have experienced something similar. Only one source for the truth—the Bible—exists. It is the guiding light, directing our path and keeping us from stumbling. The Bible shines a beam on the moral road map. If we stumble, we can talk to God. He will never ignore us, but will say, “I’ve seen worse.”

Christ brings forgiveness and acceptance and will never leave or forsake us (Hebrews 13:5). If you don’t have this guiding light in your world, God is waiting with open arms to embrace you. If your path has darkened, renew your commitment.

Follow the light of God’s Word, and you will be blessed.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



Hope for a New Year

Although a goal-oriented type of guy, I stopped making New Year resolutions a long time ago.

Since I set goals throughout the year, I wondered what the point of relegating them to one day was. And then, too, the statistics of keeping them aren’t too good. Many are broken within a short period of time. Days. Weeks.

Failing to make goals on one day doesn’t mean everything has gone well throughout the year. Weak, tired, and exhausted are three adjectives that accurately describe most previous years for anyone. Weak from sicknesses or diseases for which there is no cure and that seem to go on and on. Tired emotionally from working to meet financial responsibilities when there isn’t enough money to pay the bills—or buy groceries. Tired of studying for the degree, tired of writing papers, and tired of the late night hours. Exhausted from having to care for loved ones who can’t fend for themselves. Tired of going to a job we’d rather not go to.

Isaiah gives hope … and the key for a fresh start to a new year. Trusting in the Lord probably won’t make all, or any, of the stressors disappear. Sometimes God takes them way … sometimes He doesn’t. But trusting in Him gives us strength beyond ourselves—fortitude we can’t manufacture on our own. The new strength comes from remembering He is in control. He has come through for us in the past, and He will again. Perhaps not in the way we want or imagine, but come through He will.

That trust will cause us to soar above the trials and tribulations like an eagle that flies high above the obstacles that would restrict her flight. God will enable us to soar when ordinarily we would crash and burn. We will run the race of life without being emotionally, physically, or spiritually exhausted. We will walk through every day, with all that it brings, without falling. Even with peace … and a smile.

God never promised an easy life, but He will give us hope for every year when we look to Him.

Put your hope in God this year, not things or people.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



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